Postings

New Jersey steps up to protect investors from predatory products and advice
New Jersey’s Bureau of Securities announced a proposal that would impose a fiduciary duty on anyone giving investment advice, including brokers. Advocates greatly appreciate states such as New Jersey that are willing to step in to fill the regulatory void by providing the protections investors need and expect. New Jersey is one of several states, including Nevada and Massachusetts, seeking to set their own investment advice standards.

Stop the onslaught of annoying robocalls
Consumer Action signed on to support public testimony to the U.S. House of Representative's Subcommittee On Communications and Technology regarding potential legislative solutions to the rampant problem of illegal scam and spoofed robocalls.

Flawed HUD report lets Bank of America off the hook for possible lending violations
Consumer Action joined a group letter to the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to express serious concerns regarding a recent flawed report that incorrectly concluded that Bank of America complied with HUD rules prior to selling defaulted loans through its Distressed Asset Stabilization Program. The report relied on an inadequate sampling of loans, relied completely on Bank of America’s files, and did not include critical input from U.S. Federal Housing Administration (FHA) insured borrowers.

Is Mercedes-Benz cheating us out of clean air?
Mercedes-Benz stands accused of installing cheat devices into its diesel vehicles to evade U.S. emissions laws at the expense of consumers and the environment. Consumer Action joined advocates in urging Congress to help hold Mercedes accountable.

It’s time for Wall Street traders to pay their fair share
A tiny tax on financial transactions aims to raise revenue and cut down on speculative behavior in the stock market. The Wall Street Tax Act of 2019 would impose a small tax (0.1 percent, or 10¢ per $100) on securities transactions, including trades of stocks, bonds and derivatives.

Consumers need stronger credit reporting protections
Consumer Action joined over 80 advocate organizations in supporting the biggest overhaul of the consumer credit reporting industry in years. House Financial Services Committee Chairwoman Maxine Waters’ introduced the Comprehensive Consumer Credit Reporting Reform Act of 2019—legislation that aims to protect consumer data, prevent identity theft, and ensure the accuracy of consumer credit files.

Protect consumers, not pyramid-scheme businesses
Consumer Action joined advocates in urging the co-sponsors of the 2018 Anti Pyramid Promotional Scheme Act to refrain from reintroducing the bill in the 116th Congress. If this bill were to become law, it would eliminate the Federal Trade Commission’s authority to take action against all but the most blatant pyramid schemes, leaving millions of consumers vulnerable to fraud.

National comparison data for colleges erased
In reaction to the Education Department’s latest update to the college comparison tool, College Scorecard, consumer, higher education, and student advocates wrote to Secretary Betsy DeVos urging her to reinstate key outcome metrics that provide critical statistics for would-be students, and transparent accountability measures for the individual schools.

A major victory for cheated students on borrower defense regulations
A federal judge sided with consumer advocates and ruled that Education Secretary Betsy DeVos' delay of a key student borrower protection rule was improper and unlawful. Judge Moss also rejected a request to postpone enforcement of the Borrower Defense Rule by an association of for-profit colleges. This meant the 2016 Obama-era regulation aimed at providing relief for scammed student-loan borrowers took effect immediately, despite efforts by the Department of Education and the for-profit college industry to delay it.

Consumer advocates oppose loosening rules for FinTech providers
Consumer Action joined a coalition of 50 public interest groups in sharply criticizing the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s (CFPB) proposal to gut important consumer protection rules, especially for FinTech companies, arguing the agency does not have the authority to create potentially unlimited exemptions from the very regulations that the CFPB is obligated to enforce.

Search

Quick Menu

Facebook FTwitter T
 

Consumer Help Desk

Advocacy