Coalition Efforts

Consumer Action is working on these important issues along with other organizations. If you would like to know more about these issues, please see “More Information” at the end of each article.

 
 

Postings

Trump wants to use credit scores to keep immigrants out of the country
The Department of Homeland Security has issued a terrible proposal that intends to use immigrants’ personal credit information as part of the assessment to qualify for a green card or visa. Using an irrelevant, often error-prone, measure like a credit score to assign immigration status is not only absurd, it misuses credit information, and places financial stress and economic harm on families.

Kathy Kraninger is shockingly unqualified to lead the CFPB
Despite the nominee having no related experience or qualifications, the Senate voted in a lame duck session to confirm Kathy Kraninger as the next director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB). Advocates urged the Senate to oppose Kraninger for lack of finance, banking regulation, or consumer protection experience, as well as for her central role in administering the inhumane and un-American policy of separating thousands of children from their parents along the southwest border. Kraninger was later approved by Senate in a partisan 50-49 vote, with all Democrats opposing her nomination.

Groups renew call for no poison pill policy riders
Consumer Action is among nearly 50 groups renewing their call to keep spending measures free of poison pill policy riders. Unpopular, unnecessary, partisan provisions that get tacked on in secret have nothing to do with government funding and everything to do with undermining essential programs in order to fill a special interest wish list. Poison pill policy riders also stand in stark contrast to emergency needs that are going unmet, like guarding consumers from scams and corporate wrongdoing, securing our air, land, water and wildlife, and defending our campaign finance and election systems.

Advocates set the bar for upcoming discussion on privacy legislation
34 civil rights, consumer, and privacy organizations join in releasing public interest principles for privacy legislation, because the public needs and deserves strong and comprehensive federal legislation to protect their privacy and afford meaningful redress. The set of principles provides the bare minimum privacy protections advocates want codified in any comprehensive data privacy bill Congress considers.

National comparison data for colleges erased
In reaction to the Education Department’s latest update to the college comparison tool, College Scorecard, consumer, higher education, and student advocates wrote to Secretary Betsy DeVos urging her to reinstate key outcome metrics that provide critical statistics for would-be students, and transparent accountability measures for the individual schools.

Strong, meaningful, and comprehensive privacy principles are needed to protect consumers
In comments submitted to the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA), advocates offered suggested improvements to NTIA’s data privacy policy recommendations for the Trump Administration. The current proposal, with its risk-management rather than rights-based approach, does not provide an acceptable roadmap for the kind of privacy protection that Americans need.

Hands off the Medicare donut hole deal
Consumer Action joined a coalition of over 40 advocates in calling on Congress to reject any measures that would increase prescription drug costs for consumers, including rolling back the provisions in the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018 that make brand-name prescription drugs more affordable for people with Medicare—specifically the 70% discount required from pharmaceutical companies in the donut hole.

Trump administration to roll back fuel efficiency requirements
In comments to the Environmental Protection Agency, coalition advocates argue that the cuts outlined in Trump administration’s so-called Safe and Affordable Fuel Efficient rule, pose a threat to public safety by weakening Clean Air standards and driving up costs for consumers—harming low-income households the most with higher fuel costs, while driving up asthma rates and premature deaths.

A major victory for cheated students on borrower defense regulations
A federal judge sided with consumer advocates and ruled that Education Secretary Betsy DeVos' delay of a key student borrower protection rule was improper and unlawful. Judge Moss also rejected a request to postpone enforcement of the Borrower Defense Rule by an association of for-profit colleges. This meant the 2016 Obama-era regulation aimed at providing relief for scammed student-loan borrowers took effect immediately, despite efforts by the Department of Education and the for-profit college industry to delay it.

Consumer advocates oppose loosening rules for FinTech providers
Consumer Action joined a coalition of 50 public interest groups in sharply criticizing the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s (CFPB) proposal to gut important consumer protection rules, especially for FinTech companies, arguing the agency does not have the authority to create potentially unlimited exemptions from the very regulations that the CFPB is obligated to enforce.

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