Postings

The CFPB’s consumer education programs must be protected
In open comments to the agency, advocates urged the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) to keep its education programs, just one component in its set of consumer protection tools. Other Bureau responsibilities, including its enforcement and rulemaking authority, should also be utilized to fully protect consumers in accordance with the CFPB’s mission.

Policy riders are a shady attempt at regulating CFPB
Friends of Wall Street and the banking industry in Congress want to remove the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau from under the Federal Reserve System where it is currently housed and funded. Instead, they want to relegate it to the appropriations process in hopes of sabotaging its independence—a key element in overseeing the consumer finance markets.

Consumers deserve more control over their credit reports
Consumer, civil rights and advocacy groups wrote to members of Congress to express opposition to the Credit Access and Inclusion Act (HR 435). This legislation, if enacted, would reduce consumers’ control over their own data by preempting state and federal privacy protections, damage the credit scores of millions of consumers with a disproportionate impact on African Americans, and conflict with long-standing state utility regulatory consumer protections.

Advocates call on Congress do more for victims of Equifax breach
The Equifax data breach is prompting advocates to call on Congress for better protection of consumers' sensitive financial information. Not only should free credit freeze legislation be implemented immediately, but Congress should also resist the financial and banking industries attempts to pass legislation that preempts stronger state laws in matters that relate to consumers’ data security and privacy.

The CHOICE Act is WRONG for Americans and the economy
A bill being considered by the House, the Financial CHOICE Act, or more-aptly called “WRONG CHOICE Act” (H.R. 10) would eviscerate post Great Recession safeguards, including most of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, putting the U.S. economy and taxpayers in the same perilous position as prior to the financial crisis.

Will alt data sources help the credit invisible? It depends.
As the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) takes a closer look at alternative data and the impact it has on those who are deemed “credit thin” or “credit invisible,” consumer advocates submit their own recommendations on the matter. While it’s true that credit invisibility poses a real problem for many, a lack of credit history could be better than negative credit history. Whether the use of alternative data in calculating credit scores is likely to help or hinder one’s access to credit will depend on the information being used, the consumer’s ability to consent to its use, and the way that creditors interpret and apply the data.

The Choice Act 2.0 is the WRONG choice for consumers
Advocates are urging Congress to oppose the so-called Financial Choice Act 2.0, that aims to repeal parts and eviscerate parts of the 2010 Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, including the centerpiece Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. The (Wrong) Choice Act would grind the CFPB to a halt by turning it into a gridlocked Commission, and eliminate its independent funding. This irresponsible assault takes all the worst ideas and combines them into one toxic package.

Hands off the CFPB!
Advocates penned a very clear response to Delaware’s Senator Tom Carper’s stated interest in exploring changes to Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s (CFPB) structure: “Back off!” The CFPB has been wildly successful at protecting American consumers and weakening the agency’s oversight would be a grave mistake. The only reason to do so would be to favor the banking and financial industries that jeopardized the world economy and devastated American families less than a decade ago.

Consumers have a right to their day in court
Forced arbitration clauses are agreements that large corporations often hide in the fine print of contracts that Americans sign every day. These clauses have big consequences: By restricting access to the court system, these clauses prevent consumers who have been wronged from seeking meaningful legal recourse. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has proposed a new rule that will prohibit financial services companies and big businesses from including provisions in their fine-print agreements that prevent class-action lawsuits. It's a good start toward unraveling the growing stranglehold that forced arbitration has on consumer rights.

CEOs urged to stop using forced arbitration
Consumer Action joined coalition advocates in writing a letter to the CEOs of American Express, General Electric, JPMorgan Chase, Sears, Citigroup, Toyota and Discover Financial Services, asking them to stop putting forced arbitration clauses in their contracts because the practice is unfair and abusive. Combined, the corporations compel millions of American consumers to surrender their constitutional right to seek redress in the legal system after being victimized by unfair, deceptive or fraudulent corporate business practices.

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